Gift certificate

We are Open
7 days

We are currently open
50px

The binge eating disorder (BED) | Dina Merhbi, Nutritionist-Dietitian 

 

Dina Merhbi

Nutrition

The Binge eating disorder (BED)

a common but unknown disorder

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 

 

What is Binge Eating Disorder?

Binge eating disorder, also known as BED, affects 3 times more people than anorexia and bulimia.

It has been recognized since 2013 as a formal diagnosis.

There are over 2.8 million people suffering from BED in the United states.

However, most suffer in silence, which makes it hard to know how many people are truly affected by it.

 

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

 

How is BED diagnosed?

Binge eating is a pattern of disordered eating which consists of episodes of uncontrollable eating.

 

However, BED is more problematic and has specific criteria for diagnosis:

  •  Recurrent and persistent episodes of binge eating
  •  Binge eating episodes are associated with 3 or more of the following:
  •  Eating much more rapidly than normal
  • Eating until feeling uncomfortably full
  •  Eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry
  •  Eating alone because of being embarrassed by how much one is eating
  • Feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty after overeating
  •  Marked distress regarding binge eating
  •  Absence of regular compensatory behaviors (such as purging).

 

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

 

Who suffers from binge eating and BED?

BED is common among all races, genders and income groups.

Women might develop it in early adulthood, but men would show signs in midlife.

Also, 30% of people seeking to lose weight have BED, but only 2/3 of those that have BED are overweight.

 

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

 

What are the risk factors of having BED?

  • Family history
  • Psychological factors, like dopamine imbalance (which affects a person’s food intake by interfering with the person’s ability to regulate food cravings, creating cravings or a desire for certain foods, and increasing how much someone enjoys certain foods)
  • Dieting

 

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

 

What are the long-term effects of BED?

It may result in many of the same health risks commonly associated with obesity, such as:

  • diabetes
  •  high cholesterol
  • high blood pressure
  • heart disease
  • osteoarthritis
  • sleep apnea

 

People with binge eating disorder can also suffer from anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, or other issues that can greatly affect quality of life.

 

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

 

How can we treat BED?

Treatment, but first awareness, is important since in one survey, only 3% of people who met the criteria for BED received a BED diagnosis from their doctor.

Many are left without a diagnosis, and thus, without an answer to receive the appropriate treatment.

 

The aim of treatment is to fulfill 3 parts:

  1. Help cease the binge eating
  2. Discuss the physical and emotional factors of the binge eating
  3. Discuss the steps toward long term recovery.

Internet-based self-help program (12-weeks) did help people binge eat less often, but face-to- face therapy led to a larger and faster reduction in binge eating episodes.

Regarding certain medications, some antidepressants have helped in certain cases of BED.

In the coming month, I will be guiding you through the first steps to help you understand your eating behaviors and help you take that first leap to health.

 

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

In health and happiness,

Dina Merhbi, Nutritionist-Dietitian

Dina.merhbi@cliniquealtermed.com

50px