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Dina Merhbi

These days, food-related information is coming from everywhere:
New diet, new superfood, new food concept...
And the list goes on.
. . . . . . . . . . . . 
 

Despite all this health information,
the obesity rate continues to rise.
On the other hand, the rate of people
with eating disorders and eating obsessions
obsessive eating disorder also continues
to increase.


. . . . . . . . . . . . 
Is information overload unhealthy for us and our society?
I would say yes, too much information can be problematic, especially since the information found in magazines that talk about food, sports or health as well as books and shows that propose diets only apply to 1% of the population. Yes, 1%...

These recommendations are usually not suitable for the general population, but only for specific cases.

And, in most cases, the information we are constantly bombarded with about nutrition or sports is rarely written by health professionals who are based on information validated by scientific research.

. . . . . . . . . . . . 
Nutrition at its core is simple.
It is the bombardment of information that makes it more complex.

We are given so many ideas about nutrition that we are no longer able to listen to our bodies, our needs.

And in the end, to be healthy, we need to listen to ourselves and not follow a restrictive diet that does not take into consideration our current state of health and our personal needs.

To be healthy and to be able to listen to ourselves again, we need to free our energy and our time from this bombardment of information.

. . . . . . . . . . . . 
How can we do this?
We need to decrease our reading on "health". So, clean up your life of the information overload.

To do this, I suggest you :

Unsubscribe from popular health, sports and nutrition sites...
Unsubscribe from "health" groups on Facebook...
unsubscribe from health groups on Twitter ....
unsubscribe from magazines that talk about weight loss.
In short, unsubscribe from sites, magazines, groups or pages that may feed your restrictive and obsessive food thoughts, and make room for peace and calm*.

. . . . . . . . . . . . 
This can be a stressful task at first.... 
but give yourself a few days, and the stress will dissipate.
With this exercise, it's time to feed yourself healthy information.
Follow the sites that help you listen to your body,
sites that help you live better, all without restricting you.
Choose sites that are linked to professional organizations.
 Simplify your life, and remember that
if you have dietary questions,
it is always recommended to
consult a nutritionist.

*I recommend this exercise for readers with excessive concerns about their weight, appearance, and diet and those struggling with an eating disorder.
. . . . . . . . . . . . 
Dina Merhbi, NDG dietitian
Dina.merhbi@cliniquealtermed.com

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